Beans, Beans, Good For Your Heart! The More You Eat, The More You…

I love eating meat, so much so that my body is telling me to slow the hell down! My vegan friends shared with me some ways they get the protein they need without eating meat and I made a commitment to try all of their suggestions! I never make anything without sharing how I did it with you, and today is no different. This morning I made a very tasty semi-vegetarian breakfast I’m proud of. I still don’t know what to name it so, for now, we’ll just call it “Beans With An Attitude”.

The first thing I did was make turkey broth out of the turkey scraps left over from Thanksgiving. No, I didn’t do this today, I made broth right after dinner on Thanksgiving Thursday and have it stored in my fridge.

This is how I made the broth: I placed the turkey scraps (carcass included), chopped onion, smashed garlic, all of the vegetable and herb scraps left over from preparing dinner (celery, carrot, butternut squash, rosemary, thyme, sage), olive oil, himalayan salt, black pepper, apple cider vinegar, and water in my crock pot and set the heat to low. I slow-cooked the broth overnight and strained it into a large mason jar the next day. After the broth cooled completely, I stored the broth in my fridge.

Last night before bed, I rinsed a cup of uncooked (no cans in my home) garbanzo beans and put them in my crock pot. I added 3 cups of my homemade broth, set the heat to low, and slow-cooked overnight. This morning my beans were cooked to perfection! I took about a 1/2 cup of the beans out and rinsed them, the other half I let cool before storing them in a container in my fridge. With the beans I took out to eat, I added sundried tomatoes, goat cheese, thinly sliced red onion, himalayan salt, and freshly ground black pepper. My, my, these beans are delicious!

(If you can’t eat bone broth, use your saved vegetable scraps and make a vegetable broth. I wasn’t attempting to make a vegetarian dish, just a meal where I did not have to chew and digest actual pieces of flesh.)

On a side note: I had such a yummy time eating this this morning that I forgot to take a picture for you. I promise to add a picture the next time I make this delectable little dish.

How do you substitute meat in your diet? How do you prepare garbanzo beans?

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Silly Sunday!

A friend of mine recently wrote a post on Facebook making fun of women who take selfies. In response, I decided to take a selfie while lying in bed reading a book and post it in his comment box. Prior to my friend’s selfie post, I had never taken a selfie. Now, I think they’re so fun, I take at least one a week!

Today’s challenge: Take a selfie without trying to look good and post it in the comments or on your Facebook page. Don’t take yourself too seriously, nobody else does.

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Sharing Is Caring!

My dear blog followers and visitors,

I would love to know more about you! What is the name of your blog? What is it about? Do you have a vlog? Where are you from? What type of articles are you most interested in? Is there an article you’re proud of that you’d like to share with me? Who are your favorite writers? What book are you reading right now?

Also, here’s a little reminder to email me your mailing address if you’d like to receive a little holiday package from me.

Happy holidays, everybody!

Love,
Me
amberatevalu@gmail.com

Beware The Line Cutter!

I was waiting in line for about 15 minutes and when it was my turn, a woman cut right in front of me. I said, “Excuse me, I’m next in line.” She turned around and stared at me blankly. I wondered if she heard me so I repeated myself and let her know that I had been waiting and would like to get my ass out of there. “I’ve been waiting too.” She said. “There are two lines.” Now, I got there when my line was the only line and I don’t know when or why the second one was started. What I do know is she hadn’t been waiting in line THAT long (because the people in my line didn’t even realize a second line had been formed until she cut me). I got irritated and said, “Well, you’re the one that decided to make your own damn line when this one (I pointed down) was already established. Now you’re gonna have to wait.” As soon as I spoke those words I regretted it. My blood pressure rose and I could feel my face get hot with embarrassment. She stepped aside and let me go on ahead of her. I got out of there as quickly as I could and didn’t look back…

I thought to myself, “Oh, Amber… why do you have to be so mean?!” *face palm*

How would you have handled that? What could I have done differently?

Kombucha Skin Care!

Last year, I learned how to make my own Kombucha. Since I put just about everything I eat on my skin, I assumed my Kombucha and its “mother” would be no different. I looked up the benefits of “Kombucha skincare” and this is what I found (I just copied and pasted from http://www.kombuchakamp.com because I’m feeling a bit lazy this morning):

  • • The culture pulls circulation to the surface of the skin which regenerates the skin cells
  • • The pH of the culture has the effect of a mild and all natural acid peel which sloughs dead skin cells and leaves the skin feeling soft and smooth
  • The Kombucha culture also has many topical uses. One of the terms for the SCOBY is zooglea, which translates as “living skin” and helps heal the skin from burns, wounds and other skin ailments. Biofilms are not new and have a wide range of applications from medicinal bandages, replacement blood veins, speaker diaphragms and more. BASYC is one such biofilm that is being tested and manufactured for such purposes. They have isolated an acetobacter xylinium strain – one of the bacteria native to the Kombucha culture – to create this biofilm.
  • You can use pieces of the culture topically to speed healing of cuts, burns and other wounds. Cut a piece to size and hold in place with a bandage wrap. It will sting a bit, much like iodine.
  • • The pH of the culture inhibits the growth of harmful organisms.
  • • The bacteria send out microfibrils which are filament strands that link up with those of other bacteria creating a nano-structure that thickens over time.

For years people have told me that I look much younger than I rightfully should – I’m 33 years old and people always guess I’m at least 10 years younger! Maybe it has something to do with how I eat and what I put on my skin. Since I started making Kombucha and using it in my skincare regimen, the “you look so young” compliments increased and someone even asked me if I was 18!

Ready for my Kombucha mask recipe?! I thought so…

Ingredients:

  • Homemade Kombucha (you don’t need much)
  • Scoby (that’s the Kombucha’s “mother” or Symbiotic Colony Of Bacteria and Yeast)
  • Coconut, avocado, almond, or olive oil (I use coconut oil)
  • Bentonite clay (optional)
  • Raw honey (optional)

Directions:

  1. Blend all ingredients together in your blender
  2. Apply to skin and hair
  3. Let sit for at least 15 minutes
  4. Rinse well and follow with moisturizer (I use coconut oil)

This mask may sting a bit and cause your skin to redden. Fear not, your skin is undergoing a homemade chemical peel and… the juice is well worth the squeeze! 

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Pumpkin Face Mask: A Fall Favorite

What you need
• Leftover pumpkin purée (not from a can)
• Raw honey
• Organic heavy cream or milk

What you do
Mix all ingredients together using your preferred measurements. Go into your bathroom. Get naked! Comb or brush any tangles out of your hair. Apply pumpkin mixture all over your body, including your head. Let pumpkin mask sit for about 20 minutes before rinsing off.

What do you do with leftover pumpkin?

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